Tuesday, March 24, 2009

FREE Autographed Book by L.L. Barkat!

Stone Crossings: Finding Grace in Hard and Hidden Places by L.L. Barkat was one of the best books I read in 2008. It won a prestigious CPYU Bookshelf Award, and I’ve given it to many people as a gift. In fact, my mother-in-law was so moved by the book, she started a small group book discussion at her school.

The book is a memoir. Barket tells her powerful and penetrating story of finding grace, God and faith in the midst of pain, hardship and struggle. She is open and honest about some really dark “places” in her life but she doesn’t become cynical or trite. That’s not always easy. She writes gracefully and points readers toward hope.

It turns out that Barkat enjoys reading this blog, and was especially interested in the FREE BOOK GIVEAWAYS. (Who isn't, really?) So much so, she is offering a FREE autographed copy of Stone Crossings! (Be sure to check out L.L. Barkat’s blog!)

Here’s the question for your chance to win a FREE copy of Stone Crossings:

What is your favorite memoir?

(There needs to be at least 10 comments to qualify. Winner will be chosen randomly from list of participants. Only one comment per person.)

40 comments:

Matt said...

These might be more biographies than memoirs, but I enjoyed reading Donald Miller's "Blue Like Jazz" and Thomas Merton's "Seven Storey Mountain."

Amy said...

Memoir may be my favorite genre--Madeleine L'Engle's *Two-Part Invention*, Anne Lamott's *Traveling Mercies*, Jeanne Marie Laskas' *Fifty Acres and a Poodle*, and Lauren Winner's *Girl Meets God* are at the top of my list.

Pressing on! said...

Recently, I read Pausch's "Last Lecture," although not overtly religious, I thought it was extremely interesting and real as he described the inevitable end that was so close.

RLS said...

"The Sacred Journey" by Fredrick Buechner...the introduction alone is worth reading, as a reflection on memoir, life and the theological shared-ness of all our stories.

freestyle said...

How about an old classic... "Black and Free" by Tom Skinner.

Robin said...

A memoir that stood out as I read this was written by one of my previous Professors who was a missionary in Kenya. The title: Walking Towards Hope: Experiencing Grace in a Time of Brokenness, by Dr. Paul M. Beckingham. Dr. Beckingham's book is about a man's journey of faith, courage, and healing. I highly recommend reading this book.

Rick said...

The Lost Boy by Greg Laurie for the simplicity and struggle that is reminiscent of many in society today...

Amy said...

"Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia" by Marya Hornbacher is by far the most insightful and helpful memoir I've ever read. She explains the world of eating disorders that so many of our young girls succumb to. It has helped me greatly in my ministry with high school students.

Jason said...

It's a tough book, but Dave Eggers's 'A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius' is probably my favorite memoir. It focuses on Eggers's as he struggles to take care of his very young brother (there's a 15+ year age gap) in the wake of both of their parents dying from cancer. It's certainly raw content-wise, but Eggers's writing is phenomenal, and the story is captivating.

Dave said...

Bruchko by Bruce Olson. It was early on in my Christian walk when I read this and was deeply impacted by the sacrifices made by Bruce Olson to advance the gospel. It was through a short term mission trip that God confirmed my call to ministry, a trip I never would have taken without the inspiration from this memoir.

jarrettmcneely said...

"No Compromise" is definitely my favorite. It's the story of Keith Green's life and ministry through his wife's eyes. Melody does a great job sharing Keith's inspirational essence and how he continues to inspire long after his passing.

Ben Kendrew said...

I enjoyed the book called 'The Genessee Diary:Report from a Trappist Monastary by Henri J.M. Nouwen...a book about a busy man intentionally carving out time to get to know God and spend time with Him and others in fellowship.

Rob said...

There are several good ones already listed. A few that are personally memorable are, "A Severe Mercy" by Sheldon Vanauken, "Gifted Hands" by Ben Carson, "The Hiding Place" by Corrie ten Boom, "Peace Child" by Don Richardson, and "A Grief Observed" by C.S. Lewis.

davidpeck said...

I'm partial to Anne Lamott's "Traveling Mercies."

My most recent memoir read is one I'd recommend to anyone who grew up in the church, Matthew Paul Turner's "Churched." MPT grew up in a very mainline fundamentalist church that was wary of Pentecostals and I grew up in a very pentecostal fundamentalist church that was wary of mainline churches, I found very many shared experiences. A very good read.

Steven said...

One of my favorite memoirs is "Wild at Heart" by John Eldredge.

Tim said...

Not a genre I dip into frequently, but Anne Lamott's books are great (especially when you get the audiobook, as her readings are terrific.) I also really enjoyed "A Long Way from Tipperary: What a Former Monk Discovered in His Search for the Truth" by Jon Dominic Crossan, The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs, and The Color of Water by James McBride.

tgrosh4 said...

Having known Randy Pausch, I found his "Last Lecture" of great interest (both the video and the book). Since a child I've been quite engaged by John Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress" and then later C.S. Lewis'
"Pilgrim's Regress." In what genre do they land?

Tim said...

I would say it would have to be "No Compromise" which is the story of Keith Green. Powerful testimony of God's power

emily said...

I think you would consider this a memoir, but "The Diary of Anne Frank" was the first one I ever read, and it was in junior high, but it stil have a lasting effect on my, even today.

David Ketter said...

Night by Elie Wiesel is my favorite memoir. While it's far from happy, it speaks to a deeper level of our beings that isn't often reached by biography or memoir genres, and challenges us to think deeply about suffering and God's workings in the world.

bran_and_shann said...

Not necessarily a life-ling memoir, but C.S. Lewis' "A Grief Observed" takes you to the edge of despair with Lewis, as he journals about the death of his wife. It took my breath away.

theroses3 said...

All the previous postings list great books: my life has been touched by "No Compromise," "Traveling Mercies," "Girl Meets God," and others. "A Grace Disguised" by Gerald Sittser is another good one, as is "Passion and Purity" by Elizabeth Elliot. But my favorite right now is one of a series of memoirs written by Jon Katz. THe first one I read was "A Dog Year," my wife read and share with me his first memoir, "Running to the Mountain." I'm reading "A Good Dog" right now. The reason these are so significant is the author lives up the hill from me. He's not a Christian, but we share great spiritual conversations together. He lets my kids visit his sheep and donkeys, and we go to lunch sometimes just to talk about stuff. Jon's journey through life - and his journey through memoir writing - has reminded me of the journey we all have from unbelief to faith and ultimately to an encounter with the living God.

Jasper said...

The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom completely changed my life. I was so selfish and such a weak Christian and the story of Corrie and Betsie broke me and changed me. I cried for hours when I finished and have never been the same since.

Jon said...

I'm not sure you'd call it a true memoir, but the book Objects of His Affection by Scotty Smith has that feel, as he shares his personal journey of finding love, acceptance and forgiveness from his heavenly father. This ultimately leads to his ability to forgive his earthly father, and restoration to many broken relationships.

njjim3 said...

don't know if it would count as a "memoir" but "No Compromise" by Melody Green changed my life journey a ton!

Dr. Roger D. Butner said...

I really liked Stephen King's book, "On Writing." The first 1/2 - 2/3 is his memoir, and the rest is basically his coaching on the writing process. I thoroughly enjoyed all of it.

Sagstetter said...

I would say a quick and enjoyable read was Steve Martin's "Born Standing Up."
Though not religiously based at all ... interesting insight and even an adolescent relationship with a now Christian artist is mentioned ... interesting!

Mr. Roberts said...

I haven't read many memoirs, but it is a toss up between Donald Miller's "Blue Like Jazz" and Madeleine L'Engle's "Walking On Water." "Blue Like Jazz" is an eye opening trip into the heart of a seeker, while "Walking On Water" explains well the heart of the artist.

The Parents Page said...

I like Quiet Strength by Tony Dungy. It's not deep but it's about God and football. how can you beat that?

rescuedOne said...

My favorite Memoir was also one of the saddest and life impacting memoirs I have read. It is called "Jesus Land" and was written by Julia Scheeres. In this gripping account she chronicles her life growing up in a legalistic "christian" home and year spent at a "christian" camp for troubled kids in the Caribbean. Her experiences have left her with a terrible taste of Christianity and wants little to do with God. As a youth pastor it became a daily reminder to me to remember that every student has a story and part of my role is to hear their story and tie it in to Gods greater story of redemption.

beccabader said...

Wow there are a lot of good ones mentioned some I need to add to my must read list.
I think I would say "Tuesdays with Morrie." (What actually defines a memoir?)

wjcsydney said...

The Plains of Camdeboo by Eve Palmer is a book that is not quite memoir. I read it just as we were emigrating from South Africa, and it captured the soul of the Karoo (where my mother was born). Another favourite is Pentimento by Lillian Hellman.

Lori said...

Streams in the Desert

L.L. Barkat said...

Oh, I had planned to be quiet here. (And I surely don't need to enter to win a copy of the book :) but I had to say to "RescuedOne" (no blog to go to in order to say it)... that the memoir you mention is also one of my favorites. And it made it onto the pages of Stone Crossings.

PK said...

"Abandoned to God" the book about the life of the man whose notes were made into my favorite devotional by his wife Oswald Chambers.

sherrah said...

I love anything by Madeleine L'Engle...Two Part Invention, The Summer of the Great-Grandmother, Walking on Water.... They're all great!

Beth said...

I loved Elisabeth Elliot's These Strange Ashes and though this is not really a memoir, The Letters and Papers of Elizabeth Prentiss is also a favorite.

Julie said...

"Shadow of the Almighty" includes journal writings of Jim Elliot. He incorporated disciplines of the faith at a young age - a man on a mission.

TADTroy said...

I don't think I've read many, but the most recent one was very good, "Memoirs of an Ordinary Pastor", by D.A. Carson, about his dad.

Gretchen said...

I loved Donald Miller's "To Own a Dragon" even though it's written for men, I found it not only compelling but relevant to my own similar journey